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Maximizing the Visual Impact of Golf Course Imagery

March 14th, 2017

Maximizing the Visual Impact of Golf Course Imagery

I took up golf at an early age, encouraged by my Dad and as a way to spend time outdoors in the summer. It has been a pass time of mine off and on ever since. As my interest in photography grew so did my attraction to golf course photography. For a time I did it commercially, but unfortunately there are too many photographers working for free with the hope that they will find other markets for the images after they've given them away to the courses. Travel is not cheap. For some it apparently has worked out, but I am off topic.

Most golf courses combine interesting natural elements that are enhanced in the design process. We have architects such as Nicholas, Weiskopf, Crenshaw, Morrish and Jones to mention a few to thank. There are many considerations that combine to make a good image of a golf course. First of all is light. Without great light the images will fall flat. Therefore we shoot early and late in the day. The earlier or later the more dramatic the result. Secondly is perspective, a decision about what tells the story of that hole that represents the beauty and challenges of the hole. Green side perspectives are very effective as the goal brought into focus while fairway shots provide a broader overview of the environment. Most par 3's provide an opportunity to capture the full hole. Thirdly is how to create depth through the image. Good foreground, mid and distant elements provide ideal depth to the image that draws in the viewer. The final consideration is what to photograph. Not every hole is great photographic material. Most of the time signature holes represent the best opportunity, but not always. Take your time to scout the course before you begin shooting. What appeals to you? Take into consideration the factors outlined above and be prepared to shoot early and late!

What is your style?

January 21st, 2017

What is your style?

As a photographer and artist I see patterns in my work, things that I gravitate to and enjoy the most. Frankly, it takes a while to sort that out, but eventually you begin to see it. I still enjoy capturing a variety of subject matter, but I find myself returning to landscapes, details and dramatic settings. The simpler the better in most cases. Put me in a a chaotic urban environment and I will struggle to find the compositional elements that please my eye. It is a matter of being able to subtract enough elements to arrive at an image with fewer distractions. For me, simple is more elegant and calming. For others, the more chaos the better.

So what is your style and why is it important? I believe that your style is your signature and you do your best work in that zone. It doesn't mean you won't create meaningful work in different ways, but your style drives the core of your work and likely satisfaction. Think about what you enjoy creating and it is likely some of your best work. Apply that style with different subject matter to push your boundaries. Explore and enjoy!

 

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